There Are No Minor Auto Accidents

Not all auto accidents are the tragic ones where someone dies or is seriously injured. There are far more minor auto accidents, where a driver or passenger sustains injuries that are not life-threatening, than the kind that make the evening news. However, even minor auto accidents can have a significant monetary impact, which is why you should look into your legal options if you have been involved in an auto accident. If you’re in a minor auto accident, it’s not a good idea to just shrug it off as a “fender-bender”. Here are a few of the costs you may incur as a result of your accident: medical bills (including therapy, rehab, and counseling); medication; transportation costs involved in your medical care; pain and suffering; in-home medical care; and costs for emergency or at-the-scene care. Plus, of course, there could be damage to your vehicle. These costs add up, and you should be paid for them. If you or someone you love has been in a traffic accident in Georgia, contact Michael W. McElroy, P.C., for a free legal...

Pedestrians Rules of the Road

Pedestrians and drivers often share the roadway, and it doesn’t always work out well for the pedestrian. According to National Highway Transportation Safety Administration statistics, over 4,000 people die every year as a result of a pedestrian accident. Even though pedestrians are the victims in these accidents, they are not always in the right legally. Georgia has very specific laws about pedestrians and drivers, and here are some responsibilities that pedestrians have. Pedestrians must exercise care not to make sudden movements or try to run in front of a car that does not have sufficient time to stop. Pedestrians are required to use the sidewalk whenever there is one available. If there is no sidewalk the pedestrian should walk facing traffic on the shoulder of the road. Pedestrians always have the right of way in a marked crosswalk. If there is no crosswalk, pedestrians must yield to cars unless they are already in the roadway. If you or someone you love has been in a pedestrian accident in Georgia, contact Michael W. McElroy, for a free legal...

Left-Hand Turns – Who is Liable?

One of the trickiest situations for a driver is making a left-hand turn at a busy intersection. Drivers must not only be alert to the traffic signal, but also to cars approaching from the cross street, as well as to oncoming traffic. Because of all these factors, it’s no wonder that there are many accidents involving left-hand turns, especially in the metro Atlanta area. Who’s to blame in these situations? In legal terms, it’s almost always the fault of the motorist who’s making the left-hand turn, although there are some exceptions to the rule. Here are four situations where the motorist who is turning left is not at fault. If the traffic signal showed a green arrow, which allowed the driver to make the turn. If the other vehicle drove through a red light or stop sign. If the traffic signal was not working properly. If the driver making the turn was hit from behind by another vehicle, which pushed them into oncoming traffic. Obviously, all of these situations involve circumstances that need to be proven through some type of investigation. That’s why it is important to have police reports from the scene of the accident, as well as witness statements, photographs, and other evidence. You should also use the services of an attorney who has experience in cases like this. If you or someone in your family have been involved in a traffic accident in Georgia resulting from a left-hand turn, contact Michael W. McElroy, P.C., for a free...

Tailgating Causes Accidents

“Tailgating”, which is a term for when a person drives too close to the vehicle in front of him or her, is a common cause of traffic accidents. It happens all too frequently on the highways, and it creates a dangerous situation if the car in front has to slow down or stop suddenly. Tailgating can be caused by distracted driving, as when drivers do not pay attention because they’re texting or talking on their cell phones, or it can be a result of driver impairment due to substance abuse, or it can even occur because of a road rage situation, where the tailgating driver is narrowing the distance between cars in order to harass the driver in front. It is a problem that is on the rise, and statistics show that drivers in certain types of vehicles are the worst offenders. Almost 23 percent of drivers in sport utility vehicles (SUV) tailgate, for example. You should never tailgate another driver, and one good reason is that if you are responsible for a collision due to tailgating, you can be liable for damage and injury claims. If you are the victim of tailgating, it is important to establish that the driver behind you was driving in a reckless or negligent manner, and you may need to have supporting evidence in the form of medical reports, witness testimony, and police reports. If you or someone in your family have been a victim of a tailgating accident in Georgia, contact Michael W. McElroy, P.C., for a free...

Establishing Who is at Fault

If you get into a car accident that involves serious injury and/or property damage, there’s a good possibility that a police officer will show up on the scene. The officer will have immediate responsibilities (determining if anyone needs medical attention, getting the damaged cars out of the way of traffic, etc.), but afterward he or she will file a report about the accident to establish who is in fault. These reports can be a critical factor in deciding who is at fault for the accident, and they are used by insurance companies and the legal system in making financial awards. The police report will have the officer’s best determination as to how the accident happened and who was at fault. Police officers will usually take statements from the people involved, so it’s important to be careful about what you say. Unfortunately, most of us are somewhat upset and traumatized after a serious accident, and we may not be thinking clearly when we talk to the officer. People will often say things that can be taken the wrong way, even admitting fault for the accident, and will regret what they said later. If you are in this situation it can seem bleak, because the other driver’s insurance company may use the police report as leverage to get you or your insurance company to pay for any medical costs or damages. All is not lost, however, even if the police report says that the accident was caused by you. With the help of a personal injury attorney who is experienced in dealing with unfavorable police reports, you can get a much...